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AutoQuiz: What Should an Engineer Include in a Final Automation Project Report to Senior Management?

The post AutoQuiz: What Should an Engineer Include in a Final Automation Project Report to Senior Management? first appeared on the ISA Interchange blog site.

AutoQuiz is edited by Joel Don, ISA’s social media community manager.

This automation industry quiz question comes from the ISA Certified Automation Professional (CAP) certification program. ISA CAP certification provides a non-biased, third-party, objective assessment and confirmation of an automation professional’s skills. The CAP exam is focused on direction, definition, design, development/application, deployment, documentation, and support of systems, software, and equipment used in control systems, manufacturing information systems, systems integration, and operational consulting. Click this link for more information about the CAP program.

A final report on a highly visible automation project will be distributed to senior leaders and several operations managers. In preparing this report, an engineer would be well served to:

a) define any geometric tolerance symbols present in report diagrams
b) explain how troubleshooting procedures solved unexpected crises and plan deviations
c) include an executive summary, and, as appropriate, use bulleted lists in the narrative
d) review how cost, performance, and schedules were estimated, measured, and controlled
e) none of the above

Click Here to Reveal the Answer

Choices A, B, and D may represent important aspects of the overall understanding of the report, but these are details that can be examined once the overall conclusions are absorbed, if there is a desire to do so.

The correct answer is C, “include an executive summary, and, as appropriate, use bulleted lists in the narrative.” Very often, senior leaders and management have limited time to spend on any one topic. An executive summary and bullet-item lists allow them to understand the basic outcomes and conclusions of your project in a concise, logical, and efficient format.

Reference: Nicholas Sands, P.E., CAP and Ian Verhappen, P.Eng., CAP., A Guide to the Automation Body of Knowledge. To read a brief Q&A with the authors, plus download a free 116-page excerpt from the book, click this link.

About the Editor
Joel Don is the community manager for ISA and is an independent content marketing, social media and public relations consultant. Prior to his work in marketing and PR, Joel served as an editor for regional newspapers and national magazines throughout the U.S. He earned a master’s degree from the Medill School at Northwestern University with a focus on science, engineering and biomedical marketing communications, and a bachelor of science degree from UC San Diego.

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Source: ISA News